The Best PCs You Can Build for $300, $600, and $1200

We’ve walked you through building your own computer before, but what we didn’t do at the time is give you a suggested parts list for that new computer. In this post—which we’ll update regularly as prices and components change—we’ll walk you through the parts and hardware we’ll need for three different system builds: a budget workstation, a mid-range powerful PC, and an enthusiast’s system for gamers and media professionals.

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read more: http://lifehacker.com/5840963/the-best-pcs-you-can-build-for-600-and-1200

Tomato Hair

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What a fine looking tomato! Hiro, a hairstylist in Osaka, Japan, rendered this amazing haircut. It’s one of many strange and lovely haircuts from Japan that Kotaku’s Brian Ashcraft found. You can view the rest at the link.

Link

read more: http://www.neatorama.com/2013/04/27/Tomato-Hair/

The Well-Stocked Home Pharmacy

It’s a great idea to put all your medical stuff into a kit of some sort, even if it never leaves your house. The worst place to store medicine supplies is in the bathroom, where most people keep them. It is moist and warm there, while what medical stuff wants is dry and cool. You also want to be able to grab supplies quickly and take them where they are needed. We put ours into plastic cases the size of shoe boxes, There’s one for bandages and first aid, and another for medicines. The lids seal tight, prolonging the shelf life of the contents. When there is a first-aid injury, we get the kit and have everything together on site.

In addition to first-aid supplies here are some medicines you might consider stocking:

  • You should have an antibiotic ointment like Polysporin or a triple antibiotic.
  • Diarrhea serves a useful function to remove bad things from the body, but sometimes you may need Imodium to control excessive and severe diarrhea. Take this on your travels.
  • I like to have some hydrocortisone at home for itchy rashes and eczema.
  • Afrin nasal spray for a decongestant. Because it is targeted to the nasal area, the medicine is more potent than oral decongestants so you get more bang for the side-effect buck. Don’t use it for more than 3 days, though.
  • It’s a good idea to have an anti-fungal like Lotrimin or clotrimazole for athlete’s foot or infection of the skin.
  • Another good thing to stock is Benadryl for allergies and allergic reactions.
  • If you are traveling in exotic places (for you) ask your doctor to prescribe the antibiotic Cipro (ciprofloxacin) to take with you in case of emergency.
  • The other thing we take in our traveling medical kit is probiotics and vitamin D. Since probiotic products vary enormously, current studies suggest that the two aspects the matters most are higher numbers of colony forming units and containing more than one strain. For probiotics, aim for products with 5 billion colony forming units.

Alan Greene, MD

read more: http://kk.org/cooltools/archives/11603?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+CoolTools+%28Cool+Tools%29

Ex-Google ad engineer fights back against advertisers with anti-tracking software

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Not long ago, Brian Kennish helped to write the software that serves advertisements around the Web. First at DoubleClick and later at Google, he helped build ad servers and the developer APIs that link advertisers and ad products.

But the more he worked on ad technology, the more concerned he grew about the data advertisers were collecting about him. “I realized that despite having all of this insider knowledge, I myself had absolutely no idea where all my data was going and what was being done with it,” Kennish said. “That was a pretty scary proposition.”

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read more: http://www.theverge.com/2013/4/16/4232370/ex-google-ad-engineer-fights-back-against-advertisers-with-anti

Yasutomo 2020 Wa-Ben Wallet

I recently realized I have never been satisfied with any wallet I’ve ever owned. It was time for that to change.

I thought about the Slimmy (which still looks pretty fantastic), until I remembered reading an interview with William Gibson. He talked about some crazy wallet made out of a material called Cuben.

Now this sounded promising. I headed off to Google and searched for “william gibson wallet.” The top result took me to a review of the Yasutomo Wa-Ben wallet at unfinishedman.com.

Chad’s review convinced me that the Yasutomo 2020 Wa-Ben wallet, made in Hong Kong by Jason Hung and touted as the world’s first Cuben Fiber wallet (specifically, Cuben Fiber CT9K.5), could be exactly what I was looking for.

So I slapped down an electronic $49.50 (post-paid from Hong Kong), and three weeks later I signed for my new wallet at the post office (it seems the people in charge of these decisions deem packages from Hong Kong as untrustworthy).

After carrying it around daily for about a week, I can say it was exactly what I was looking for.

The wallet is extremely light (0.69 ounces, according to the website), extremely thin (you can see through it!), and extremely durable. I often forget I’m even carrying it and have to frantically check my front pocket to see if it’s there. It always is.

It has six credit card pockets, two “hidden” pockets behind the card pockets, and two cash/note pockets, so there’s plenty of room to carry more than enough.

So here’s my short review. The Yasutomo 2020 Wa-Ben wallet is fabulous piece of gear, and I recommend it highly for anyone looking to lighten their everyday carry load.

Tom Fassbender

Yasutomo 2020 Wa-Ben Wallet
$50

Manufactured by Yasutomo 2000

read more: http://kk.org/cooltools/archives/10564?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+CoolTools+%28Cool+Tools%29